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Notes: Very long essay ahead, wrapping up the final part of my last Frodo screencap series. I don't plan to do any other large-scale capping projects. I'll still make new caps to illustrate reflections or poems, but the ongoing project I've been working on since 2005 is at an end. I'll post a brief entry providing links for browsing the full collection in the coming days. But feel free to skip the essay and go straight to the caps and poem. As with the previous entry, in addition to my caps there are several spectacular caps by Blossom. Don't miss them. And visit Blossom's gorgeous Frodo website, In Dreams. Also featured is the brilliant conclusion to jan-u-wine's Lórien Suite. It appears below the fullscreen caps.

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Note: There were so many caps for this scene I had to divide it into two parts. The first half of this post contains the introductory comments, the book scene, the film text and half the screencaps. The second half, Galadriel's Glade Pt. 4b, contains the rest of the screencaps and the poem jan-u-wine has written inspired by both sections. At the bottom of this half's screencaps is a link to the second part.


In my opinion, Galadriel’s big transformation scene ("In place of a dark lord, you will have a queen") does not do well by Tolkien, nor by the films.
Read more... )If the scene works for me at all (and it does, barely), it is because of the acting of Elijah Wood. Read more... )

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Here is the second half of the post, which includes more film text with accompanying caps, and the 4th entry in jan-u-wine's Lórien Suite. Written from Galadriel's point of view, it allows the reader deeply and thoughtfully into her experience of the encounter in the Glade.

Also featured are seven screencaps by Blossom. If you don't know her work from her gorgeous Frodo website, In Dreams, Blossom's screencaps are like no others. Each is a jewel, a little work of art. The caps below are from the EE edition of FOTR (in widescreen); mine, as usual, come from the theatrical version in fullscreen format.

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The following quote from "The Mirror of Galadriel" (fuller excerpt below), is a passage etched indelibly on my mind's eye:

She lifted up her white arms, and spread out her hands towards the East in a gesture of rejection and denial. Eärendil, the Evening Star, most beloved of the Elves, shone clear above. So bright was it that the figure of the Elven-lady cast a dim shadow on the ground. Its rays glanced upon a ring about her finger; it glittered like polished gold overlaid with silver light, and a white stone in it twinkled as if the Elven-star had come down to rest upon her hand. Frodo gazed at the ring with awe; for suddenly it seemed to him that he understood.

None of my favourite Tolkien illustrators have been able to capture this moment for me in visual art. I wondered what the filmmakers would do with it, considering the iconic nature of the vision invoked. Read more... )

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As mentioned in Pt. 1 of this series, the film scene is very different from the book scene it is based on. The most obvious difference is that there is no Sam in the film scene. But the main change is in the portrayal of Galadriel. At Henneth Annún, Sam tries to describe her to Faramir. Read more... )

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I love the caps for this scene. Except for "Nuclear Gladys" (as it was called on the messageboard I frequented while the films were coming out), the scene is uninterrupted cinematic gorgeousness. It's a different animal from the book's Lothlórien scenes, but as cinema it really works. The book's Lórien, with its images of jewel-fresh nature sparkling with "poignant freshness" under a golden sun, becomes a world of shadows , cold and luminous as if lit by a winter moon. Instead of a sense of safe haven, the Fellowship enters a realm pulsing with a feeling of foreboding and danger. Their Elven hosts warn rather than welcome. My book-reading self says, "this is wrong, wrong, wrong!" but my film-going self is mesmerised. Why does it work, and why does it seem faithful, even though it is so wide of the original? I think it's because it strongly evokes what Tolkien elsewhere said about Faerie.

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The final part of the film scene comes from material at the end of The Council of Elrond, but also from the beginning of the chapter that follows.
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I really love Elrond’s speech to Frodo after he volunteers to take the Ring. It's so gratifying to hear someone as wise and respected and powerful as Elrond say, for all to hear, that in taking up the Quest Frodo has chosen to do that which puts him in the company of the great. Read more... )

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I’ve mentioned regularly during this Rivendell series how much reading the chapters again has reminded me of Bilbo’s importance as a character in the story, in spite of not actually being in it very much, and of the warmth of his relationship with Frodo. Read more... )

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Reading the book scene again, I realise how much I miss the presence of Bilbo in the film’s Council of Elrond. I can see why they struck him from the scene, and it worked, since it served to accentuate Frodo’s relationship with Gandalf. Read more... )

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Note: Long opening post with lots of pictures and text. My apologies to dial-up users.


Here begins a five-part presentation of the Council of Elrond. The filmmakers said they worked long and hard trying to make the extended historical accounts that fill this chapter into an interesting film scene. I think they succeeded. Read more... )

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The FOTR sequence screencapped below, the scene in which Sam argues persuasively that they ought to be heading home, is original to the film. It has no direct book equivalent. I decided to use a book scene from the opening of the Ring Goes South to go with it, even though the film scene takes place before the Council, not after it.

The connection I see between the book scene and the film scene is a strong sense of Frodo’s reluctance. Read more... )


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One of the things that struck me, re-reading these chapters set in Rivendell, is how close, what intimate friends Frodo and Bilbo actually are. I had forgotten. In part, it is because of the book itself: Bilbo isn’t there that much, literally, in the pages of The Lord of the Rings—an inevitability, perhaps, because he doesn’t go on the Quest.
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Where has the year gone? Here it is the middle of fall and I feel as though I have barely posted a thing in my LJ (compared to previously). Events in real life put a halt to my LJ projects for a while, and, when I returned, although I posted some Frodo comparisons, a new manip and a series on Ian McKellen, I did not have the concentration to resume the screencap series. But now it’s back.

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Read more... ) So here it is, a series of screencaps of Frodo’s joyous reunions—but in Rivendell, not Minas Tirith—plus jan-u-wine’s poem, “The Gifts of the Three Hobbits”.
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This post is to commemorate March 25, the Fall of Barad-dûr, showcasing jan-u-wine’s poem They All Imagine. In the poem, Frodo recalls the day from the perspective of many years spent in Tol Eressëa.

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The caps below follow immediately from the ones in the previous post, in which the Fellowship has just left Lórien.

In the next five caps, the Fellowship is further down the river. The look of the caps is shadier, and Frodo has developed a blemish (more on that below). Read more... )



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The first set of caps show Frodo just after the Fellowship has got into the boats and begun their journey down the river. Frodo is shown remembering the gift-giving, when Galadriel gave him the crystal phial containing the light of Eärendil, along with her blessing.
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Before the Frodo screencap series goes on its little sabbatical, jan-u-wine and I would like to express our thanks to our readers. Who knows? Some of you may not be visiting here by the time it starts up again. I don’t have that much more to do—some scenes in Rivendell, maybe some “pick-ups” from Bree and Weathertop, plus some more of Lothlórien. For the time being, I want to work on some other things.

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I know I keep saying of this or that EE scene, "what a shame this scene wasn’t included in the theatrical version", but what a shame this wasn't included in the theatrical version! Not only is it beautiful, it accomplishes a lot, narratively. I'll mention just a few of the things I think this scene does well.
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