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When jan-u-wine first showed me this poem (which imagines Elijah Wood’s last take playing Frodo, finishing the Red Book), I had already posted my screencaps for that moment in the RotK EE extras. I thought, "What a shame I hadn’t seen this poem before!" I had already presented caps for the writing desk scene, too (see links for those below).
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Before the Frodo screencap series goes on its little sabbatical, jan-u-wine and I would like to express our thanks to our readers. Who knows? Some of you may not be visiting here by the time it starts up again. I don’t have that much more to do—some scenes in Rivendell, maybe some “pick-ups” from Bree and Weathertop, plus some more of Lothlórien. For the time being, I want to work on some other things.

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Below are two poems by jan-u-wine set in the time before Frodo comes to live with Bilbo at Bag End. I had already posted a splendid poem for the fullscreen version of this scene last year (links below), but these two poems inspired me to cap the "Ride to the Grey Havens" scene again, but in widescreen.
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Warning: Many images. My apologies to dial-up viewers.


A month or so ago, talking over the end of the screencap series with jan-u-wine, she suggested this poem, An Extra Ordinary Life, as a sort of final retrospective. I thought using it would be a great idea. So I formatted a practice version of the poem, then went about the business of looking for faces I thought would capture the mood of individual speakers, as well as reflecting the arc of the over-all narrative of the poem.*
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These caps are very dear to me, so beautiful, so speaking, and so tenderly humorous are they—the humour that only those who have suffered the worst together can share. Jan-u-wine’s poems, Harthad Uluithiad and Bronwe Athan Harthad, make them even dearer.
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If you follow this project, you will know that I have already screencapped this scene, extensively, in fullscreen. But I so loved this poem, which I only just saw—Jan’s look at Frodo’s quiet euphoria after the destruction of the Ring—that I decided to re-do the scene using the widescreen edition.
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I hadn't planned to cap this segment, but, looking at the larger sequence this week, I thought, why not? The moment when Frodo looks around and first realises what has been set in motion by the destruction of the Ring is a wonderful one. Read more... )



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I capped this scene primarily because of my fondness for Frodo’s impressive jeté over the river of lava, but also because I wanted caps to go with jan-u-wine's poem, They Are Here.

Written from Frodo’s point of view, in the midst of the downfall of Mt. Doom and Barad-dûr, the poem shows Frodo standing at the edge of hope, a hope as yet not quite realised.
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Warning:~Some gory images, although I refrained from posting the really clinical shots of Frodo’s maimed hand.


I don’t think this entry requires any discussion from me. The power of the images, and the film scene they recall, are enough to shake the soul of any Frodo devotee.
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More super caps of the same scene. In this set, Frodo looks as if he is just beginning to be persuaded by Sam's pleas.Read more... )



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Warning: Some gory images.


As every reader knows, the incident of Frodo hanging suspended from the side of the Sammath Naur never happened in Tolkien's book. But here it is, in four posts of screencaps. I know, it's hard to believe, considering how many of these caps look the same apart from variations in the lighting, but these represent less than half of the caps I actually made before forcing myself to throw the majority of them out.

When I first saw RotK, having decided I hated the film half an hour in, I hated this scene, too. Read more... )



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Here begins a series of four entries, all detailing the film moment in which Frodo is hanging from the side of the Sammath Naur. It’s self-indulgent, since he really does not look that different from frame to frame. Four entries of screencaps?? But his face is so beautiful in these, and so variously poignant, I couldn’t resist.
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Warnings: Again, my apologies to dial-up viewers for the many images.

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Warning: Many images (my apologies to dial-up viewers), some very gory.


There was a lot of talk about this scene among fans on the messageboards when RotK first came out. There was praise, but also plenty of argument about the departures from the book--not just about the loss of most of the Sammath Naur dialogue, but the manner of Gollum's death, that is, the fight at the brink.
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For this post, the book scene will come first. The film script and screencaps follow. Unfortunately, there is no poem. There is, however, a long discussion section. Those not interested should scroll past it to the images.

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This last "Gorgoroth Revisted" post features the conclusion of the widescreen "I can carry you" screencaps, plus jan-u-wine's short but very powerful poem, The Last Hours.

The book excerpt is also short, but, similarly, shows Tolkien's genius. It hasn't many words, but it has import. It gives a good sense of the short way left before them, and Sam's surge of hope at the sight of it. An earlier book passage, included in the last entry, best illustrates the caps of Sam heaving Frodo over his shoulder. (Not quite "pig-a-back" as recounted in the book, but very affecting all the same.) The scoring for that moment, in which a statement of the expansive "Into the West" theme is heard for the first time, is perfection.

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This entry features the first part of the “taste of strawberries” screencaps, but in widescreen, screencaps made to complement another of jan-u-wine's narrative poems, Another Sunless Dawn. Read more... )



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This entry—the first of three posts re-visiting Gorgoroth in widescreen (I made fullscreen caps of these scenes last year)—was made to showcase a poem by jan-u-wine, Where You Are Bound. The next two posts will feature poetry by Jan, too, which is the reason I made the new sets of caps.

I chose the book scenes for the series to illustrate both the poems and the caps.
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This is really just a series of concluding close-ups. It is short, but very important, conveying Frodo and Sam’s new mutual understanding [that there will be no return journey]. The book passage, too, is a powerful one, cherished by most fans, if for various reasons.

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